Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/913
Title: Teaching With a Fully Digital, Year-long Math Program: Learning Sciences Futures on the Front Line
Authors: Roschelle, Jeremy
Herman, Phillip
Bumgardner, Karen
Shechtman, Nicole
Feng, Mingyu
Issue Date: Jul-2018
Publisher: International Society of the Learning Sciences, Inc. [ISLS].
Citation: Roschelle, J., Herman, P., Bumgardner, K., Shechtman, N., & Feng, M. (2018). Teaching With a Fully Digital, Year-long Math Program: Learning Sciences Futures on the Front Line. In Kay, J. and Luckin, R. (Eds.) Rethinking Learning in the Digital Age: Making the Learning Sciences Count, 13th International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS) 2018, Volume 1. London, UK: International Society of the Learning Sciences.
Abstract: In the context of a large-scale randomized controlled trial, our team investigated "front line" teaching issues as schools implemented a fully digital, blended learning curriculum in mathematics. This paper focuses mostly on observations of instruction within schools that were assigned to use the new digital resources. Compared to a business-as-usual control group, the structure of classroom activity and teaching practices changed in the treatment group. Observers, who were blind to student achievement outcomes, found two overall patterns in treatment classrooms across five categories of observations. Later quantitative analysis indeed found the "high" and "low" patterns could account for some of the variance in achievement outcomes within the treatment condition. We explore observed patterns in terms of existing learning science theory and suggest areas where further development of the learning sciences may be needed and how learning sciences can contribute to improvement of digital, blended learning environments.
URI: https://doi.dx.org/10.22318/cscl2018.632
https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/913
Appears in Collections:ICLS 2018

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