Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/6843
Title: Blending Everyday Movement and Representational Infrastructure: An Interaction Analysis of Kindergarteners Coding Robot Routes
Authors: Silvis, Deborah
Lee, Victor
Clarke-Midura, Jody
Shumway, Jessica
Kozlowski, Joseph
Keywords: Learning and Identity
Issue Date: Jun-2020
Publisher: International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)
Citation: Silvis, D., Lee, V., Clarke-Midura, J., Shumway, J., & Kozlowski, J. (2020). Blending Everyday Movement and Representational Infrastructure: An Interaction Analysis of Kindergarteners Coding Robot Routes. In Gresalfi, M. and Horn, I. S. (Eds.), The Interdisciplinarity of the Learning Sciences, 14th International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS) 2020, Volume 1 (pp. 98-105). Nashville, Tennessee: International Society of the Learning Sciences.
Abstract: If we want to design for computer science learning in K12 education, then Kindergarten is the place to start. Despite differing formats, early childhood coding tools rely heavily on a similar representational infrastructure. Grids and arrows predominate, introducing a nested series of directional symbols and spatial skills children must learn in order to code. Thus, learning to think computationally is entangled with learning to think spatially and symbolically. This paper analyzes video of Kindergarten students learning to use robot coding toys and examines how they navigated programming’s representational infrastructure. We found that children drew on conventional notions of how objects move, creating a “conceptual blend” for programming robot routes (Fauconnier & Turner, 1998). We argue that coding in Kindergarten requires mapping a series of correspondences from the domain of everyday movements onto the resources available in the representational domain.
URI: https://doi.dx.org/10.22318/icls2020.98
https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/6843
Appears in Collections:ICLS 2020

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