Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/653
Title: Sequencing Support for Sense Making and Perceptual Fluency with Visual Representations: Is There a Learning Progression?
Authors: Rau, Martina A.
Zahn, Miranda Renee
Issue Date: Jul-2018
Publisher: International Society of the Learning Sciences, Inc. [ISLS].
Citation: Rau, M. A. & Zahn, M. R. (2018). Sequencing Support for Sense Making and Perceptual Fluency with Visual Representations: Is There a Learning Progression?. In Kay, J. and Luckin, R. (Eds.) Rethinking Learning in the Digital Age: Making the Learning Sciences Count, 13th International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS) 2018, Volume 1. London, UK: International Society of the Learning Sciences.
Abstract: We tend to assume that visuals help students learn. But visuals can impede learning if students lack representational competencies that enable them to understand what the visuals show. We consider two instructional activities that target two qualitatively different representational competencies: explicit sense-making competencies and implicit perceptual fluency. Prior cross-sectional studies showed that students’ prior knowledge determines in which sequence they should receive sense-activities and perceptual-activities. This raises the question: is there a learning progression for sense-making competencies and perceptual fluency? In this paper, we address this question with a longitudinal experiment in which 71 students worked with sense-activities and perceptual-activities integrated in six instructional units of a chemistry undergraduate course. For each unit, students either received sense-activities or perceptual-activities first. We assessed learning gains of chemistry knowledge after each unit. Results suggest a learning progression that aligns with results of prior cross-sectional studies.
URI: https://doi.dx.org/10.22318/cscl2018.264
https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/653
Appears in Collections:ICLS 2018

Files in This Item:
File SizeFormat 
32.pdf406.51 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.