Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/6293
Title: Net.Create: Network Analysis in Collaborative Co-Construction of Historical Context in a Large Undergraduate Classroom
Authors: Craig, Kalani
Danish, Joshua
Humburg, Megan
Szostalo, Maksymilian
McCranie, Ann
Hmelo-Silver, Cindy E.
Keywords: Design
Issue Date: Jun-2020
Publisher: International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)
Citation: Craig, K., Danish, J., Humburg, M., Szostalo, M., McCranie, A., & Hmelo-Silver, C. E. (2020). Net.Create: Network Analysis in Collaborative Co-Construction of Historical Context in a Large Undergraduate Classroom. In Gresalfi, M. and Horn, I. S. (Eds.), The Interdisciplinarity of the Learning Sciences, 14th International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS) 2020, Volume 2 (pp. 1055-1062). Nashville, Tennessee: International Society of the Learning Sciences.
Abstract: History educators in large-lecture humanities undergraduate classrooms struggle to support reading comprehension, defined as the ability to simultaneously read a complex text critically, understand the text’s details and context, and vet the text’s claims. Critical reading of historical texts in particular helps bridge the gap between seeing history as memorization-oriented and seeing it as an inquiry-oriented discipline that reconstructs narrative and context. Net.Create is an open-source, network-analysis software tool paired with activities that support intuitive creation and revision of a network data set and accompanying visualization, and through these representational practices, reading comprehension in humanities classrooms. Findings show that as students draw on details in a historical text to collaboratively construct a larger network, they begin to emphasize context reconstruction over memorization.
URI: https://doi.dx.org/10.22318/icls2020.1055
https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/6293
Appears in Collections:ICLS 2020

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