Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/554
Title: Developing a Library of Typical Problems During Collaborative Learning in Online Courses
Authors: Strauß, Sebastian
Rummel, Nikol
Stoyanova, Filipa
Krämer, Nicole
Issue Date: Jul-2018
Publisher: International Society of the Learning Sciences, Inc. [ISLS].
Citation: Strauß, S., Rummel, N., Stoyanova, F., & Krämer, N. (2018). Developing a Library of Typical Problems During Collaborative Learning in Online Courses. In Kay, J. and Luckin, R. (Eds.) Rethinking Learning in the Digital Age: Making the Learning Sciences Count, 13th International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS) 2018, Volume 2. London, UK: International Society of the Learning Sciences.
Abstract: Feelings of isolation and a lack of interactivity are among the reasons cited for student drop-out in online learning settings like MOOCs. A possible solution is to offer MOOC participants the opportunity to engage in collaborative activities. However, small-group collaboration in MOOCS poses several challenges which may reduce the beneficial effects of collaboration and reduce participants’ satisfaction with both the collaboration process and the course. In this work-in-progress paper, we describe the development of a library of typical problems that may occur during online collaboration in asynchronous, text-based online settings. The library covers the following aspects of collaboration: communication, joint information processing, coordination, and reciprocal interaction. The library was generated in a process by combining a top-down literature search and a bottom-up identification of typical problems in existing collaboration data. The library will be used as a basis for developing intelligent support for student collaboration in online courses.
URI: https://doi.dx.org/10.22318/cscl2018.1045
https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/554
Appears in Collections:ICLS 2018

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