Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/3073
Title: What is seen on the screen? Exploring collaborative interpretation, representational tools and disciplined perception in medicine
Authors: Gegenfurtner, Andreas
Issue Date: Jun-2009
Publisher: International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)
Citation: Gegenfurtner, A. (2009). What is seen on the screen? Exploring collaborative interpretation, representational tools and disciplined perception in medicine. In Dimitracopoulou, A., O'Malley, C., Suthers, D., & Reimann, P. (Eds.), Computer Supported Collaborative Learning Practices: CSCL2009 Community Events Proceedings (pp. 71-72). Rhodes, Greece: International Society of the Learning Sciences.
Abstract: Diagnostic decision-making in medicine involves meaning-making of what can be seen on medical images, such as positron emission tomography (PET) pictures. This meaning- making is seldom an individual activity; rather it involves interactional practices between clinical staff, and between the physician and the specific representational technology. This poster presentation contributes to earlier studies on professional vision and disciplined perception in that it emphasizes the role of feedback, power relations, and ontogeny that shape collaborative interpretation of what is seen on the screen. Taking an analytical perspective founded in ethnomethodology and conversation analysis, this study will closely examine participants of a medical training in PET reading to be held in a Finnish university hospital in spring 2009. Video-recorded data will be analyzed using discourse analytical methods with a focus in understanding the appropriation of professional concepts and analytical skills in relation to feedback, ontogeny, and power. Practical and theoretical implications are outlined.
URI: https://doi.dx.org/10.22318/cscl2009.2.71
https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/3073
Appears in Collections:CSCL 2009

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