Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/2986
Title: Does social software fit for all? Examining students’ profiles and activities in collaborative learning mediated by social software
Authors: Laru, Jari
Näykki, Piia
Järvelä, Sanna
Issue Date: Jun-2009
Publisher: International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)
Citation: Laru, J., Näykki, P., & Järvelä, S. (2009). Does social software fit for all? Examining students’ profiles and activities in collaborative learning mediated by social software. In O'Malley, C., Suthers, D., Reimann, P., & Dimitracopoulou, A. (Eds.), Computer Supported Collaborative Learning Practices: CSCL2009 Conference Proceedings (pp. 469-476). Rhodes, Greece: International Society of the Learning Sciences.
Abstract: In this study the dependencies between higher education students' profiles, activities, and learning outcomes in collaborative learning -- as mediated by social software -- were examined. Although the sample size in this study was small (n=22), Bayesian Dependency Modeling method provided statistically viable insight. The results show that learners who were active reflectors in their blogs, but who were also interested in what others achieved, obtained the best results in knowledge tests. Based on the analysis, two distinct learner profiles that reflect differences in the students' dependencies can be distinguished: monitor and reflector. Furthermore, an indirect dependencies found in the analysis suggests that both reflectors and monitors are also active wiki editors and participants in face-to-face discussions. Further qualitative analyses are needed in order to get an in-depth view of the complex interactions and dependencies within and between the face-to-face and virtual, but also individual and social, planes of collaboration.
URI: https://doi.dx.org/10.22318/cscl2009.1.469
https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/2986
Appears in Collections:CSCL 2009

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