Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/2729
Title: 'I study features; believe me, I should know!': The mediational role of distributed expertise in the development of student authority
Authors: Langer-Osuna, Jennifer
Engle, Randi
Issue Date: Jun-2010
Publisher: International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)
Citation: Langer-Osuna, J. & Engle, R. (2010). 'I study features; believe me, I should know!': The mediational role of distributed expertise in the development of student authority. In Gomez, K., Lyons, L., & Radinsky, J. (Eds.), Learning in the Disciplines: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS 2010) - Volume 1, Full Papers (pp. 612-619). Chicago IL: International Society of the Learning Sciences.
Abstract: This paper examines the development of student authority in a case of one student assigned the role of topic expert in a classroom that utilized distributed expertise as a participation structure during collaborative projects. Using video data of a heated student-led debate, we show how this student successfully positioned himself with greater authority than recognized adult experts, despite the fact that his evidence was often weak given classroom norms. He was able to do so for two reasons. First, he utilized his role as topic expert to position himself with authority and discredit others, including the recognized adult experts. Second, he drew on student allies that supported his position. We conclude with implications of this paper for how participation structures may mediate the development of powerful student identities, and function in concert with other interactional factors in the classroom.
URI: https://doi.dx.org/10.22318/icls2010.1.612
https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/2729
Appears in Collections:ICLS 2010

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