Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/2653
Title: Promoting Learning in Complex Systems: Effect of Question Prompts versus System Dynamics Model Progressions as a Cognitive-Regulation Scaffold in a Simulation-Based Inquiry-Learning Environment
Authors: Eseryel, Deniz
Law, Victor
Issue Date: Jun-2010
Publisher: International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)
Citation: Eseryel, D. & Law, V. (2010). Promoting Learning in Complex Systems: Effect of Question Prompts versus System Dynamics Model Progressions as a Cognitive-Regulation Scaffold in a Simulation-Based Inquiry-Learning Environment. In Gomez, K., Lyons, L., & Radinsky, J. (Eds.), Learning in the Disciplines: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS 2010) - Volume 1, Full Papers (pp. 1119-1126). Chicago IL: International Society of the Learning Sciences.
Abstract: Designing effective technology-based learning environments is challenging. Designing effective technology-based learning environments to facilitate learning about complex knowledge domains is more challenging. To a large extent, the key to the puzzle lies in identifying which scaffolding strategies are more effective; and under which conditions. In a simulation-based inquiry-learning environment, this controlled study investigated the effect of two promising scaffolding strategies; question prompts and system dynamics model progressions, on ninth-grade biology students' cognitive regulation and complex problem- solving skills. For simpler complex problems, findings suggested that both scaffolding strategies were equally effective. However, as the problems increased in complexity, system dynamics model progressions were significantly more effective for facilitating both cognitive regulation and complex problem-solving skills.
URI: https://doi.dx.org/10.22318/icls2010.1.1119
https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/2653
Appears in Collections:ICLS 2010

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