Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/2645
Title: Software-Based Scaffolding: Supporting the Development of Knowledge Building Discourse in Online Courses
Authors: Fujita, Nobuko
Teplovs, Christopher
Issue Date: Jun-2010
Publisher: International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)
Citation: Fujita, N. & Teplovs, C. (2010). Software-Based Scaffolding: Supporting the Development of Knowledge Building Discourse in Online Courses. In Gomez, K., Lyons, L., & Radinsky, J. (Eds.), Learning in the Disciplines: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS 2010) - Volume 1, Full Papers (pp. 1056-1062). Chicago IL: International Society of the Learning Sciences.
Abstract: This design-based research study investigated instructional scaffolding for knowledge building discourse among participants (n=17, n=20) in two online graduate courses. In particular, designs of software-based scaffolding as found in web-based Knowledge Forum's scaffold support feature were refined. Analyses of the student discourse data suggests that Knowledge Forum's scaffold supports offer a promising avenue for future design innovations to encourage knowledge building discourse. Results show that students increasingly used the scaffolds to focus their reading and writing of notes over iterations of the study. The proportion of scaffolds for knowledge building discourse increased during each iteration with a corresponding decrease in the proportion of scaffolds for expressing an opinion in the second iteration. Finally, notes with scaffolds contained significantly more words than notes without scaffolds, suggesting that scaffolds promoted more student reflectivity. Implications for formative assessment of student learning and knowledge building are discussed.
URI: https://doi.dx.org/10.22318/icls2010.1.1056
https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/2645
Appears in Collections:ICLS 2010

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