Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/1158
Title: How Do Learners Process Information in Lectures? The Role of Projected Slides and Type of Note- taking
Authors: Wecker, Christof
Issue Date: Jun-2014
Publisher: Boulder, CO: International Society of the Learning Sciences
Citation: Wecker, C. (2014). How Do Learners Process Information in Lectures? The Role of Projected Slides and Type of Note- taking. In Joseph L. Polman, Eleni A. Kyza, D. Kevin O'Neill, Iris Tabak, William R. Penuel, A. Susan Jurow, Kevin O'Connor, Tiffany Lee, and Laura D'Amico (Eds.). Learning and Becoming in Practice: The International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS) 2014. Volume 1. Colorado, CO: International Society of the Learning Sciences, pp. 519-526.
Abstract: Today's lectures are typically supported by means of computer-based slide projections, and it is common for learners to take notes on printed handouts containing the lecturer's slides. In a 2x2-factorial design involving 81 students, the effects of slide projection (absent vs. present) and type of note-taking (on empty sheets vs. on handouts) were investigated with respect to the learners' processing of information and their knowledge about information presented on slides and about information presented orally immediately after a lecture and two weeks later after an additional review phase. Preliminary analyses indicate a beneficial effect of note-taking on handouts on knowledge about information presented on slides after the additional review phase, which appears to be mediated to a substantial extent by the processing of information presented on slides while watching the lecture. Hence the effect cannot be explained exclusively by the completeness of this information in the learners' notes.
URI: https://doi.dx.org/10.22318/icls2014.519
https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/1158
Appears in Collections:ICLS2014

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