Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/1133
Title: Enacted Misconceptions: Using Embodied Interactive Simulations to Examine Emerging Understandings of Science Concepts
Authors: Lindgren, Robb
Tscholl, Michael
Issue Date: Jun-2014
Publisher: Boulder, CO: International Society of the Learning Sciences
Citation: Lindgren, R. & Tscholl, M. (2014). Enacted Misconceptions: Using Embodied Interactive Simulations to Examine Emerging Understandings of Science Concepts. In Joseph L. Polman, Eleni A. Kyza, D. Kevin O'Neill, Iris Tabak, William R. Penuel, A. Susan Jurow, Kevin O'Connor, Tiffany Lee, and Laura D'Amico (Eds.). Learning and Becoming in Practice: The International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS) 2014. Volume 1. Colorado, CO: International Society of the Learning Sciences, pp. 341-347.
Abstract: In this paper we describe an approach to examining and potentially diagnosing middle school students' misconceptions and emerging understanding about science concepts using immersive and interactive simulations. There are varying views in the literature on the nature of science misconceptions and the role they ought to play in learning interventions, but we focus here on their manifestation in physical activity as opposed to their detection via standardized inventories. We describe a novel framing of incorrect and emerging notions of science, and we illustrate this framing with descriptions of students' embodied interactions in an immersive digital simulation of planetary astronomy. Through live observation and video analysis we identified 9 misconceptions that were made visible through the student's bodily activity rather than through verbal accounts. We conclude with a discussion of how these same diagnostic environments may be used for instruction and remediation.
URI: https://doi.dx.org/10.22318/icls2014.341
https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/1133
Appears in Collections:ICLS2014

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