Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/1128
Title: A Study of Subjective Emotions, Self-Regulatory Processes, and Learning Gains: Are Pedagogical Agents Effective in Fostering Learning?
Authors: Mudrick, Nicholas
Azevedo, Roger
Taub, Michelle
Begnagh, Reza Feyzi
Bouchet, François
Issue Date: Jun-2014
Publisher: Boulder, CO: International Society of the Learning Sciences
Citation: Mudrick, N., Azevedo, R., Taub, M., Begnagh, R. F., & Bouchet, F. (2014). A Study of Subjective Emotions, Self-Regulatory Processes, and Learning Gains: Are Pedagogical Agents Effective in Fostering Learning?. In Joseph L. Polman, Eleni A. Kyza, D. Kevin O'Neill, Iris Tabak, William R. Penuel, A. Susan Jurow, Kevin O'Connor, Tiffany Lee, and Laura D'Amico (Eds.). Learning and Becoming in Practice: The International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS) 2014. Volume 1. Colorado, CO: International Society of the Learning Sciences, pp. 309-316.
Abstract: Though some research has focused on agent-direct affective processes, none has examined its impact on multi-agent learning environments and on the detection, modeling and fostering of self-regulated learning processes. 38 participants interacted with MetaTutor, an intelligent, multi-agent hypermedia-learning environment, to learn about the human circulatory system. The log files, containing information about their overall performance, and self-report measures, assessing emotions and impressions towards agents obtained from their interactions with MetaTutor were used to assess the relationship between subjective agent- directed emotions, SRL processes and overall learning gains. Results indicate that agent- directed emotions were not significantly related to SRL strategy use, negative agent-directed emotions were significantly related to negative learning gains and negative agent-directed emotions for two specific agents (representative of two SRL pillars) were related to negative learning gains. Implications for the design of multi-agent systems and the role of emotions during human-agent interactions and their relation to learning are discussed.
URI: https://doi.dx.org/10.22318/icls2014.309
https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/1128
Appears in Collections:ICLS2014

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