Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/10357
Title: Scaffolding the Conceptual Salience of Directed Actions
Authors: Fogel, Ariel
Swart, Michael
Grondin, Matthew
Xia, Fangli
Schenck, Kelsey E.
Nathan, Mitchell J.
Keywords: Learning Sciences
Issue Date: 2023
Publisher: International Society of the Learning Sciences
Citation: Fogel, A., Swart, M., Grondin, M., Xia, F., Schenck, K. E., & Nathan, M. J. (2023). Scaffolding the conceptual salience of directed actions. In Blikstein, P., Van Aalst, J., Kizito, R., & Brennan, K. (Eds.), Proceedings of the 17th International Conference of the Learning Sciences - ICLS 2023 (pp. 910-913). International Society of the Learning Sciences.
Abstract: As the grounded and embodied cognition (GEC) paradigm continues to inform teaching and learning research, action-cognition transduction (ACT) suggests that performing cognitively relevant movements can enhance students’ conceptualizations. For learning mathematics, participants’ awareness of the relationship between the cognitively relevant movements and the geometric conjectures they are reasoning about remains underexplored. Research in analogical problem-solving underscores the importance for problem solvers to notice similarities between two analogous domains before adapting the solution from one problem to the other. This pilot study investigates differences in participants’ reasoning and gestures before and after receiving a hint drawing their attention to the cognitive relevance of the movements they performed. The data suggest that when correctly reasoning about the geometric conjectures, participants explicitly leveraged spontaneous replays of the cognitively relevant movements in their explanations after receiving the hint.
Description: Short Paper
URI: https://doi.org/10.22318/icls2023.261803
https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/10357
Appears in Collections:ISLS Annual Meeting 2023

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