Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/7296
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBarany, Amanda
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yeyu
dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, David
dc.contributor.authorFoster, Aroutis
dc.coverage.spatialBochum, Germanyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-09T15:44:05Z
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-09T19:46:24Z-
dc.date.available2021-10-09T15:44:05Z
dc.date.available2021-10-09T19:46:24Z-
dc.date.issued2021-06
dc.identifier.citationBarany, A., Wang, Y., Williamson, D., & Foster, A. (2021). Who I Am, What I Know, and What I Want: An Epistemic Network Analysis of Student Identity Exploration. In Hmelo-Silver, C. E., De Wever, B., & Oshima, J. (Eds.), Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning - CSCL 2021 (pp. 107-114). Bochum, Germany: International Society of the Learning Sciences.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.dx.org/10.22318/cscl2021.107
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.isls.org//handle/1/7296-
dc.description.abstractThis paper reports outcomes of 57 students’ exploration of urban planning and environmental science identities through Virtual City Planning, a course implemented in a science museum that leveraged a virtual learning environment supported by in-class play-based experiences. Identity exploration trajectories were assessed using the Projective Reflection framework, which consists of constructs that capture cognitive, affective, and behavioral features of the self in addition to learners’ self-perceptions and definitions. Researchers constructed a parsimonious epistemic network that was supported by in-depth qualitative interpretations to a) visualize students’ general trends of student self-reflection across the course experience and b) highlight which Projective Reflection constructs were highly nascent to participants as they engaged in identity exploration. Results further theoretical understandings of how courses designed to support identity exploration influence the sophistication and content of learners’ reflections on the self and illustrate the utility of epistemic networks for visualizing identity exploration trajectories over timeen_US
dc.format.extentpp. 107-114
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherInternational Society of the Learning Sciencesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning - CSCL 2021en_US
dc.subjectCSCLen_US
dc.titleWho I Am, What I Know, and What I Want: An Epistemic Network Analysis of Student Identity Explorationen_US
dc.typeConference Paperen_US
dc.typeLong Paperen_US
Appears in Collections:ISLS Annual Meeting 2021

Files in This Item:
File SizeFormat 
107-114.pdf421.77 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.