Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/238
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dc.contributor.authorTsovaltzi, Dimitra
dc.contributor.authorDutta, Nikita
dc.contributor.authorPuhl, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorWeinberger, Armin
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-19T10:50:27Z
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-19T08:58:12Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-19T10:50:27Z
dc.date.available2017-06-19T08:58:12Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07
dc.identifier.citationTsovaltzi, D., Dutta, N., Puhl, T., & Weinberger, A. (2017). Group and Individual Level Effects of Supporting Socio-Cognitive Conflict Awareness and Its Resolution in Large SNS Discussion Groups: A Social Network Analysis In Smith, B. K., Borge, M., Mercier, E., and Lim, K. Y. (Eds.). (2017). Making a Difference: Prioritizing Equity and Access in CSCL, 12th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) 2017, Volume 1. Philadelphia, PA: International Society of the Learning Sciences.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps:dx.doi.org/10.22318/cscl2017.35
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.isls.org/handle/1/238-
dc.description.abstractSNS (social networking sites) provide great opportunities for access to knowledge sources and equity in publicly expressing ideas, opinions and attitudes. They define a rich context of socio-cognitive interactions in which conflict can arise. Supports for conflict awareness and argumentation processes to resolve the conflict can foster learning. This article presents a comparative 2×2 field study (N=98) of such supports in a university course that included weekly SNS discussions. Group Awareness Tools (GATs) were used to increase attitude conflict awareness, and argumentation scripts as a cognitive guidance to help learners capitalize on this awareness and resolve the conflict productively. We use Social Network Analysis (SNA) to gain a group-level understanding of the effects of argumentation on attitude change relative to peer interactions. We measure number of interactions, information flow control, influence distribution, and attitude similarity. Both GATs and argumentation script influence group processes, but argumentation script shows more substantial influence.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPhiladelphia, PA: International Society of the Learning Sciences.en_US
dc.titleGroup and Individual Level Effects of Supporting Socio-Cognitive Conflict Awareness and Its Resolution in Large SNS Discussion Groups: A Social Network Analysisen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
Appears in Collections:CSCL 2017

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