Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/2270
Title: Identity and Digital Media Production in the College Classroom
Authors: Halverson, Erica
Bass, Michelle
Issue Date: Jul-2012
Publisher: International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)
Citation: Halverson, E. & Bass, M. (2012). Identity and Digital Media Production in the College Classroom. In van Aalst, J., Thompson, K., Jacobson, M. J., & Reimann, P. (Eds.), The Future of Learning: Proceedings of the 10th International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS 2012) – Volume 2, Short Papers, Symposia, and Abstracts (pp. 217-221). Sydney, NSW, AUSTRALIA: International Society of the Learning Sciences.
Abstract: We sought to understand whether digital media production in the freshman college classroom could afford students the opportunity to engage with identity. Specifically, students were tasked with producing autobiographical radio documentaries in the style of This American Life. We used the development of metarepresentational competence (MRC) as our measure for how effectively students engaged with identity in their production process. We found three types of MRC trajectories: Students who demonstrated MRC throughout the process, students who demonstrated MRC late in the process, and students who never demonstrated MRC. Students who demonstrated MRC created pieces that took advantage of the affordances of radio as a mode for self-representation as they communicated their personal stories and reflected on the relationship between tools and ideas in sophisticated ways. Our findings can inform the design of learning environments within fields of artistic production as well as other content areas emphasizing the importance of "identity work" in learning, a focus in recent design-based learning sciences research.
URI: https://doi.dx.org/10.22318/icls2012.2.217
https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/2270
Appears in Collections:ICLS 2012

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