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dc.contributor.authorKollar, Ingo
dc.contributor.authorUfer, Stefan
dc.contributor.authorLorenz, Elisabeth
dc.contributor.authorVogel, Freydis
dc.contributor.authorReiss, Kristina
dc.contributor.authorFischer, Frank
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-08T16:18:06Z
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-08T22:02:42Z-
dc.date.available2020-01-08T16:18:06Z
dc.date.available2020-01-08T22:02:42Z-
dc.date.issued2012-07
dc.identifier.citationKollar, I., Ufer, S., Lorenz, E., Vogel, F., Reiss, K., & Fischer, F. (2012). Using Heuristic Worked Examples and Collaboration Scripts to Help Learners Acquire Mathematical Argumentation Skills. In van Aalst, J., Thompson, K., Jacobson, M. J., & Reimann, P. (Eds.), The Future of Learning: Proceedings of the 10th International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS 2012) – Volume 1, Full Papers (pp. 331-338). Sydney, NSW, AUSTRALIA: International Society of the Learning Sciences.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.dx.org/10.22318/icls2012.1.331
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.isls.org//handle/1/2223-
dc.description.abstractMathematical argumentation skills include an individual-cognitive component, which refers to the individual ability to generate and evaluate arguments on a mathematical conjecture, and a social-discursive component describing the skills necessary to develop and defend arguments on how to solve mathematical problems in collaborative situations. In an experimental 2x2 design (N = 119), we investigated whether both components can be fostered through heuristic worked examples and collaboration scripts which were implemented in a CSCL environment. Results indicate that the individual-cognitive component was facilitated by the provision of heuristic worked-out examples, whereas the social-discursive component was fostered through the use of collaboration scripts and of heuristic worked examples. Both scaffolds were especially helpful for learners with higher general ability. It appears that scaffolds on a content level as well as scaffolds on a social level are necessary to help learners attain high levels of mathematical argumentation skills.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherInternational Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)en_US
dc.titleUsing Heuristic Worked Examples and Collaboration Scripts to Help Learners Acquire Mathematical Argumentation Skillsen_US
dc.typeFull Papersen_US
Appears in Collections:ICLS 2012

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