Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/6666
Title: Whose Video?: Surveying Implications for Participants Engagement in Video Recording Practices in Ethnographic Research
Authors: Elliott, Colin Hennessy
Radke, Sarah
DeLiema, David
Silvis, Deborah
Vogelstein, Lauren
Vossoughi, Shirin
Hall, Rogers
Keywords: Learning and Identity
Issue Date: Jun-2020
Publisher: International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)
Citation: Elliott, C. H., Radke, S., DeLiema, D., Silvis, D., Vogelstein, L., Vossoughi, S., & Hall, R. (2020). Whose Video?: Surveying Implications for Participants Engagement in Video Recording Practices in Ethnographic Research. In Gresalfi, M. and Horn, I. S. (Eds.), The Interdisciplinarity of the Learning Sciences, 14th International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS) 2020, Volume 1 (pp. 414-421). Nashville, Tennessee: International Society of the Learning Sciences.
Abstract: This symposium aims to build on the argument for viewing video recording as theory (Hall, 2000) by focusing on instances when participants intentionally engage with ongoing recording, move/interact with recording equipment, and (re)purpose video records. All four papers use example interactions to highlight how participants reorient data collection and use, reorganizing control over how their stories are recorded, shared, and analyzed in the future; we argue that these moves are attempts to further relationship building, countering the surveillance technologies cameras have become (Vossoughi & Escude, 2016). We discuss further the methodological implications for future research, asking video recording as whose theory?
URI: https://doi.dx.org/10.22318/icls2020.414
https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/6666
Appears in Collections:ICLS 2020

Files in This Item:
File SizeFormat 
414-421.pdf235.45 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.