Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/3537
Title: Effects of Conceptual Representation on Learning from Hypermedia
Authors: Liu, Lei
Marathe, Surabhi
Hmelo-Silver, Cindy
Issue Date: Jun-2006
Publisher: International Society of the Learning Sciences
Citation: Liu, L., Marathe, S., & Hmelo-Silver, C. (2006). Effects of Conceptual Representation on Learning from Hypermedia. In Barab, S. A., Hay, K. E., & Hickey, D. T. (Eds.), The International Conference of the Learning Sciences: Indiana University 2006. Proceedings of ICLS 2006, Volume 1 (pp. 439-445). Bloomington, Indiana, USA: International Society of the Learning Sciences.
Abstract: Studying complex systems is increasingly important in many domains. Several features shared by complex systems hinder deep understanding. For example, understanding complex systems involves thinking about multiple interdependent levels, non-linear causality and/or emergence. Conceptual representations offer opportunities to become integrating frameworks across different domains. This study investigates how alternative conceptual representations embodied in hypermedia can help middle school students better understand a complex system, the human respiratory system. We designed two versions of instructional hypermedia based on structure-behavior-function theory. SBF is a conceptual representation that is part of the disciplinary toolbox of biologists and thus is an appropriate representation for learning in this domain. One hypermedia was function-centered while the other was structure-centered. We contrasted the instructional effects of these two alternative conceptual representations. Students using the function-centered hypermedia developed deeper understanding than those using the structure-centered version on one of the two measures. Implications and limitations are discussed.
URI: https://doi.dx.org/10.22318/icls2006.439
https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/3537
Appears in Collections:ICLS 2006

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