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dc.contributor.authorAsterhan, Christa
dc.contributor.authorSchwarz, Baruch
dc.contributor.authorHowe, Christine
dc.contributor.authorSchwartz, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Taylor
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-09T11:22:18Z
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-09T16:46:42Z-
dc.date.available2020-01-09T11:22:18Z
dc.date.available2020-01-09T16:46:42Z-
dc.date.issued2008-06
dc.identifier.citationAsterhan, C., Schwarz, B., Howe, C., Schwartz, D., & Martin, T. (2008). On socio-cognitive processes that promote learning from peer collaboration and why immediate transfer tests cannot always detect their effects. In Kanselaar, G., Jonker, V., Kirschner, P. A., & Prins, F. J. (Eds.), International Perspectives in the Learning Sciences: Cre8ing a learning world. Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference for the Learning Sciences – ICLS 2008, Volumes 3 (pp. 174-181). Utrecht, The Netherlands: International Society of the Learning Sciences.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.dx.org/10.22318/icls2008.3.174
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.isls.org//handle/1/3241-
dc.description.abstractResearch into the benefits of collaborative work on learning have shifted from questions regarding whether it promotes learning, to research into the conditions that promote learning and the identification of processes that make collaborative group settings particularly effective. In this symposium we will present findings from recent research into a number of socio-cognitive processes that have been found to foster conceptual gains following group learning. The papers that will be presented as part of this symposium will focus on three different phenomena: argumentation, production feedback and the incubation effect of collaboration. In addition, these studies also show that the effects of collaborative learning may not be apparent immediately following interaction, but need some time to materialize. This finding emphasizes the need for multiple and delayed assessment, as well as alternative assessment tools, such as prospective (instead of retrospective) measures of learning. .en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherInternational Society of the Learning Sciences, Inc.en_US
dc.titleOn socio-cognitive processes that promote learning from peer collaboration and why immediate transfer tests cannot always detect their effectsen_US
dc.typeSymposiaen_US
Appears in Collections:ICLS 2008

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