Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/3191
Title: Cutting through Layers of the BBC ‘ONION Street’: Children’s Use of Message Boards out-of-school
Authors: Yang, Yang
Crook, Charles
O’Malley, Claire
Issue Date: Jun-2008
Publisher: International Society of the Learning Sciences, Inc.
Citation: Yang, Y., Crook, C., & O’Malley, C. (2008). Cutting through Layers of the BBC ‘ONION Street’: Children’s Use of Message Boards out-of-school. In Kanselaar, G., Jonker, V., Kirschner, P. A., & Prins, F. J. (Eds.), International Perspectives in the Learning Sciences: Cre8ing a learning world. Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference for the Learning Sciences – ICLS 2008, Volumes 2 (pp. 467-474). Utrecht, The Netherlands: International Society of the Learning Sciences.
Abstract: We explored children's spontaneous use of the Onion Street Maths and English message boards out-of-school. These are open-access, study support forums that are widely accessed and well-regarded by teachers and students in the UK. 416 messages were collected on the Maths board and 893 messages were collected on the English board. Sustained engagement was rare. Around 90% of user identities contributed only once. Nearly two thirds of threads on both boards did not get any reply. Sequential observation and content analysis were used to identify themes emerging in the discussion. Results revealed that although children came to the boards mainly for seeking help and asking questions, discussions around different curriculum subjects (Maths and English) were structured differently. Because of children's limited skills in asking questions, the boards had limited value for learning conversations. However, sharing emotional reactions to study and examination may still have made the resource a useful one.
URI: https://doi.dx.org/10.22318/icls2008.2.467
https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/3191
Appears in Collections:ICLS 2008

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