Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.isls.org/handle/1/196
Title: Anchor Code: Modularity as Evidence for Conceptual Learning and Computational Practices of Students Using a Code-First Environment
Authors: Wagh, Aditi
Levy, Sharona
Horn, Michael
Guo, Yu
Brady, Corey
Wilensky, Uri
Issue Date: Jul-2017
Publisher: Philadelphia, PA: International Society of the Learning Sciences.
Citation: Wagh, A., Levy, S., Horn, M., Guo, Y., Brady, C., & Wilensky, U. (2017). Anchor Code: Modularity as Evidence for Conceptual Learning and Computational Practices of Students Using a Code-First Environment In Smith, B. K., Borge, M., Mercier, E., and Lim, K. Y. (Eds.). (2017). Making a Difference: Prioritizing Equity and Access in CSCL, 12th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) 2017, Volume 2. Philadelphia, PA: International Society of the Learning Sciences.
Abstract: In response to increasing calls to include computational thinking (CT) in K-12 education, some researchers have argued for integrating science learning and CT. In that vein, this paper investigates conceptual learning and computational practices through the use of a code-first modeling environment called Frog Pond in a middle school classroom. The environment was designed to enable learners to explore models of evolutionary shifts through domain-specific agent-based visual programming. It was implemented as a curricular unit in seventh grade science class. We analyzed video and log data of two contrasting student pairs. This paper presents one of our findings: Development of modular core functional code-units or what we call anchor code. Anchor code is a body of code that creates a stable base from which further explorations take place. We argue that anchor code is evidence for conceptual learning and computational practices.
URI: https://repository.isls.org/handle/1/196
https://dx.doi.org/10.22318/cscl2017.102
Appears in Collections:CSCL 2017

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