Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.isls.org/handle/1/1173
Title: Everyday Life Science and Engineering:Bridging the Gap Between Formal and Informal Learning among Native American Students in the Northwestern United States
Authors: Galbreath, Marcie
Honey, Rose
Honwad, Sameer
Kern, Anne
Meyer, Chris
Laumatia, Laura
Issue Date: Jun-2014
Publisher: Boulder, CO: International Society of the Learning Sciences
Citation: Galbreath, M., Honey, R., Honwad, S., Kern, A., Meyer, C., & Laumatia, L. (2014). Everyday Life Science and Engineering:Bridging the Gap Between Formal and Informal Learning among Native American Students in the Northwestern United States. In Joseph L. Polman, Eleni A. Kyza, D. Kevin O'Neill, Iris Tabak, William R. Penuel, A. Susan Jurow, Kevin O'Connor, Tiffany Lee, and Laura D'Amico (Eds.). Learning and Becoming in Practice: The International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS) 2014. Volume 3. Colorado, CO: International Society of the Learning Sciences, pp. 1653-1654.
Abstract: This poster explores Native American student ideas regarding science and engineering and tries to understand how they bridge the formal and informal perceptions of these two disciplines. Students from a tribal community in the Northwest participated in a summer camp that focused on merging indigenous and non-indigenous knowledge systems about science and engineering. Using drawings, storytelling and interviews, the study discusses learning processes associated with youth who live in one Native American community as they develop an understanding of science and engineering phenomena.
URI: https://doi.dx.org/10.22318/icls2014.1653
https://repository.isls.org/handle/1/1173
Appears in Collections:ICLS 2014

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